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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic; Now tracking the new emerging SARS-like coronavirus known as the Wuhan Coronavirus in China.

47,000 pigs slaughterd,rivers turn red with blood.

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    Posted: November 12 2019 at 1:49pm
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South Korean river turns red after being polluted with pigs' blood
12 November 2019 Asia
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Image copyrightYEONCHEON IMJIN RIVER CIVIC NETWORKThe river having turned red after the pigs were killed
Image captionThe river turned red from the blood of thousands of slaughtered pigs
A river near the inter-Korean border has turned red after being polluted with blood from pig carcasses.

South Korean authorities had culled 47,000 pigs in an attempt to halt the spread of African swine fever (ASF).

Heavy rains caused blood to flow from a border burial site into a tributary of the Imjin River.

African swine fever is highly contagious and incurable, with a near zero survival rate for infected pigs, but it is not dangerous to humans.

Local authorities dismissed concerns that the blood could cause the spread of African swine fever to other at-risk animals, saying the pigs had already been disinfected before being slaughtered.

Boar with swine fever found in Korea border zone
Why millions of pigs are being culled in Asia
Is China losing the battle against an incurable pig virus?
It also said emergency steps had been taken to prevent further pollution.

An outbreak across Asia
The pig-culling operation was carried out over the weekend. The carcasses were said to have been left inside multiple trucks at a burial side near the inter-Korean border.

A delay in the production of plastic containers used for burial disposal meant that burials could not be carried out immediately.

Image copyrightGETTY IMAGESAn aerial photo shows workers wearing protective suits and driving pigs to kill at a farm
Image captionSouth Korea has been culling pigs in response to swine fever
ASF was only discovered in South Korea recently, and there was speculation it arrived via pigs crossing the heavily guarded demilitarised zone (DMZ) that separates the North and South.

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The first case of ASF was recoded in North Korea in May, and the South made great efforts to keep it out, including border fences.

The South Korean military was authorised to kill any wild boars seen crossing the DMZ.

Despite the precautions, South Korea reported its first case on 17 September - with the total now at 13. There are around 6,700 pig farms in South Korea.

Much of Asia has been affected by the outbreak, including China, Vietnam and the Philippines. Some 1.2 million pigs have been culled in China alone.

More on this story
African swine fever: Boar with virus found in demilitarised zone
03 October 2019

Swine fever: How is Asia coping with the outbreak?
09 September 2019

Is China losing the battle against an incurable pig virus?
24 April 2019

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12 Monkeys...............
1995 ‧ Science fiction film/Thriller ‧ 2h 11m a must for AFT
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MADNESS........

12 Monkeys...............
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 12 2019 at 3:33pm
I thought they only shot people on the NK border. Pigs too eh?

What next?


Sorry! That was my bad sense of humour. I made a pigs ear of that one.

Seriously, this realy is bad!
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Bulgaria to cull 24,500 pigs after ASF outbreak

Jan 6, 2020, 2:42pm

Veterinary authorities in Bulgaria have said that 24,500 pigs will be culled after another outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) in the southern European country.

According to a report by international news agency Reuters, the outbreak – which was confirmed through laboratory testing – was detected at a pig farm in the north-east of Bulgaria, and is the first such outbreak on an industrial farm since August, when outbreaks on six breeding farms resulted in the country’s veterinary authorities culling 130,000 pigs.

According to local English-language website The Sofia Globe, measures have been taken to control the most recent outbreak, including a 3km protection zone around the affected farm, as well as a 10km monitoring zone.

The culling and disposal of pigs found to be affected, as well as those that have been in contact with infected animals, well get underway in due course, according to the Bulgarian Food Safety Agency.

The head of that agency, Paskal Zhelyazkov, told Bulgarian National Television that separating infected pigs from healthy ones would not be possible, as “the infection has penetrated the site so extensively”.

There were 42 confirmed outbreaks of ASF in Bulgaria in 2019, with the equivalent of around €35 million being spent on preventative measures and farmer compensation.

The country’s government plans to initiate legislation this coming year to further deal with the issue.

At the very end of 2019, the Government here reminded pig farmers not to feed household waste to pigs.

Michael Creed, the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, said on December 29: ASF can survive for months in cooked or cured meats which – fed to pigs – can cause the disease.”

The minister warned: “A simple ham sandwich, salami or meat product could bring this disease to our doorstep and it would be devastating.”


Source:   https://www.agriland.co.uk/farming-news/bulgaria-to-cull-24500-pigs-after-asf-outbreak/
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Serbia Reports ASF Outbreak in Wild Boars

Jennifer Shike   January 15, 2020 11:13 AM

Serbia announced an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) on Wednesday in wild boars in the east of the country, near its borders with Bulgaria and Romania.

The state Tanjug news agency said the disease was discovered in two hunting grounds in the eastern Serbian areas of Pirot and Kladovo, Reuters reports.

To help stop the spread of this deadly virus of pigs, authorities have ordered shooting of boars to reduce their population in the affected areas.

Although ASF is harmless to humans and poses no food safety risks, it is causing devastation in the global pork industry. It first appeared in August 2018 in China and has been spreading in Europe and Asia.

Serbia’s neighbors Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria have already reported outbreaks of the disease, mainly spread by boars which are also a popular game among hunters in the region, Reuters reports.

Last August, several pig farms in Serbia were affected by ASF.

Pigs in Pangasinan Culled to Contain ASF
Meanwhile, at least 21 pigs in Barangay Linoc in the province of Pangasinan in the Philippines were culled yesterday to contain the spread of ASF.

Provincial veterinarian Jovito Tabarejos said blood tests confirmed ASF, the Philippine Star reports.

The pigs were within the one-kilometer radius of a piggery where 34 pigs died due to ASF last week. Currently 320 pigs in backyard piggeries in Barangay Linoc are under observation, the Philippine Star reports.


Source:   https://www.porkbusiness.com/article/serbia-reports-asf-outbreak-wild-boars
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[Nothing new here, but a summary/analysis, from a very reputable source, for the interested]

Disease that killed millions of China's pigs poses global threat
Tom Polansek


CHICAGO (Reuters) - Bettie the beagle, a detector dog for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, picked up the scent of pork on a woman arriving from China at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.

Soon the dog’s handler discovered and confiscated a ham sandwich in the purse of a passenger who had flown on a China Eastern Airlines flight from Shanghai.

The danger? That the food might be contaminated with African swine fever and spread the disease to the United States. China has lost millions of pigs in outbreaks of the disease, pushing its pork prices to record highs, forcing purchases of costly imports and roiling global meat markets.

“It’s very likely it may come here if we aren’t more vigilant,” said Jessica Anderson, the handler for the pork-sniffing dog and an agricultural specialist for the border protection agency.

Bettie is among an expanded team of specially trained beagles at U.S. airports, part of a larger effort to protect the nation’s $23 billion pork industry from a disease that has decimated China’s hog herd, the world’s largest. Governments worldwide are scrambling to shore up their defenses as the disease spills over China’s borders, according to Reuters reporting from nine countries. The efforts underscore the grave threat to global agriculture.

African swine fever has spread to Southeast Asia and eastern Europe, with cases found in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Korea, Myanmar, the Philippines, Poland, Belgium and Bulgaria. Around the globe, those countries and others that have so far sidestepped the epidemic are cracking down on travelers, increasing cargo screenings and banning meat imports.

Pork-producing countries stand to lose billions of dollars if the disease infects their industries because outbreaks devastate farms and shut export markets. African swine fever does not threaten humans but there’s no vaccine or cure for infected pigs.

If the disease enters the United States, the top pork-exporting nation with 77.3 million hogs, the government would struggle to protect the industry, participants in a four-day drill in September told Reuters.

“If this gets in, it will destroy our industry as we know it,” said Dave Pyburn, the National Pork Board’s senior vice president of science and technology.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) simulated an outbreak in Mississippi that spread to the nation’s top pig-producing states, including North Carolina, Iowa and Minnesota. Veterinarians, farmers and government officials gathered at command centers where they tested their capacity to swiftly detect, control and clean up after an outbreak.

The experience showed the U.S. needs to increase its capacity to quickly test pigs for the disease and to dispose of the animals without spreading it, said Pyburn, who participated in the drill.

In China, the top global pork consumer, the disease has been devastating. The exact number of hog deaths is not known. Rabobank estimated the country lost up to 55% of its pig herd last year. But the Chinese government has reported smaller losses in the country’s $1 trillion hog sector since the first case in August 2018.

GLOBAL RESPONSE

The U.S. government is fielding dogs at airports and seaports, conducting outbreak-response drills and adding capacity to test pigs. France and Germany are killing hundreds of thousands of wild boar that might carry the disease. France also erected 132 kilometers (82 miles) of fencing to keep out wild boar and is planning stricter sanitary rules for pig farming, including requirements to disinfect trucks that transport swine.

Thailand culled pigs in a province close to Myanmar, where the disease has been found. South Korea ordered soldiers on its border with North Korea to capture wild boar, while Vietnam used troops to ensure infected pigs were culled.

Australia expelled travelers from Vietnam for smuggling pork and banned imports of pork products. Australia also deployed advisors to Pacific islands in an attempt to protect its closest neighbors from African swine fever. If such efforts fail, it could cost the country more than 2 billion Australian dollars ($1.4 billion) over five years, according to Australian Pork Limited, an industry group.

“It is certainly the biggest threat to commercial raising that we have ever seen, and arguably the biggest threat to any commercial livestock species we’ve seen,” said Mark Schipp, Australia’s chief veterinary officer.

U.S. officials plan to suspend domestic shipments of pigs among farms and to slaughterhouses if African swine fever is detected. The USDA and states could issue orders halting the movement of livestock in certain areas as a way to contain the disease.

The USDA said in a statement to Reuters that the September drill highlighted shortcomings in its guidance to states detailing when and how to limit the movement of pigs. The government is also increasing the number of laboratories it uses to test for African swine fever.

“We have identified some gaps,” said Amanda Luitjens, who took part in the drill and is animal welfare auditor for Minnesota-based pork producer Christensen Farms. “The thought of it making it to the United States is scary.”

Travelers transporting meat represent the biggest risk for African swine fever to spread to the United States because the disease can live for weeks in pork products, Pyburn said.

Contaminated food can be fed to feral pigs or livestock in a practice known as garbage feeding, which the USDA says has caused outbreaks of swine diseases around the world. U.S. farmers are supposed to obtain a license to feed pigs with food waste that contains meat and cook it to kill disease organisms.

African swine fever can also spread from pig to pig, from bites by infectious ticks and through objects such as trucks, clothing and shoes that have come into contact with the virus.

China banned the transportation of live pigs from infected provinces and neighboring regions in an unsuccessful bid to contain its outbreaks. It also culled pigs and outlawed the use of kitchen waste for swine feed.   

The disease has been detected in food products seized at airports in South Korea, Japan, Australia, the Philippines and northern Ireland.

African swine fever is thought to have arrived in the Philippines through contaminated pork smuggled from China. The Philippines is now conducting mandatory checks on carry-on luggage of passengers from countries with outbreaks.

The government of the province of Cebu in central Philippines banned imported products and those from the main Philippine island of Luzon to avoid swine fever. More than 60,000 pigs have died or been culled in Luzon because of the disease. The Philippines Department of Agriculture also banned garbage feeding that included leftover food from airports, airlines and seaports.

In the United States, low inspection rates at ports of entry increase the likelihood for illegal pork to enter the country undetected, the USDA said in a report assessing the risk from African swine fever. The agency works with Customs and Border Protection to alert all U.S. ports each time a new country is confirmed to have the disease, requesting increased scrutiny on travelers and shipments.

But Customs and Border Protection estimates it needs 3,148 people to specialize in agricultural inspections at entry points like airports and only has about 2,500.

The U.S. Senate last year authorized the annual hiring of 240 agricultural specialists a year until the workforce shortage is filled, and the training and assignment of 20 new canine teams a year. The government approved 60 new beagle teams to work at airports and seaports last year, for a total of 179 teams, according to USDA.

Those teams face a daunting challenge, said Senator Gary Peters, a Michigan Democrat who introduced the legislation with other lawmakers.

“Every day, millions of passengers and tens of thousands of shipping containers carrying food products cross our nation’s borders,” he said, “any one of which could do significant damage to America’s food supply and agricultural industries.”

Source:   https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-swinefever-disease-insight/disease-that-killed-millions-of-chinas-pigs-poses-global-threat-idUSKBN1ZF1FP
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China's 2019 pork output plunges to 16-year low as disease culls herd

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BEIJING (Reuters) - China’s 2019 pork output plunged to a 16-year low, official data showed on Friday, as the fatal hog disease African swine fever killed millions of pigs in the world’s top producer.
FILE PHOTO: A vendor is surrounded by pork as she cuts a piece for a customer at a market in Beijing September 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Gray

China, which is also the world’s biggest pork consumer, produced 42.55 million tonnes of the meat last year, down 21.3% from 2018, and the lowest output since 2003, according to National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) data.

African swine fever, an incurable virus that kills almost all the pigs it infects but does not harm humans, reached China in 2018 and spread to farms across the country.

China’s food prices have soared as pork costs have increased amid the supply shortage, driving inflation close to an eight-year high in the world’s second-largest economy.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs reported China’s hog herd had declined in October by 41% from a year earlier but rose by 2% in November. That data did not give a total herd size.

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On Friday, the NBS said the pig herd declined 27.5% from a year earlier to 310.41 million head by the end of December. That is up from the 306.75 million head it reported for the first nine months of the year.

Some analysts and industry insiders have disputed the official government toll on the herd size, believing the decline was larger.

The NBS also reported that the number of slaughtered hogs last year fell 21.6% to 544.19 million head.

Rabobank forecast in November that China’s pork production would shrink by 25% in 2019 to about 40.5 million tonnes, and a further 10% to 15% in 2020.

The government has sought to stabilize prices by releasing hundreds of thousands of tonnes of frozen pork from reserves. Imports have also surged, with December arrivals of pork meat almost double the previous monthly record.

Total meat output including pork, beef, lamb and poultry fell 10.2% in 2019 to 76.49 million tonnes, the NBS data also showed.

Beef output rose 3.6% to 6.67 million tonnes while poultry output jumped 12.3% to 22.39 million tonnes.


Source:   https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-economy-output-pork/chinas-2019-pork-output-plunges-to-16-year-low-as-disease-culls-herd-idUSKBN1ZG08H
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