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Climate Change People Watch I Dare You

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    Posted: December 01 2019 at 3:37pm
All you climate change people need to read and watch this. The Climate Change people would not show up to this says a lot. If you are telling the truth you would show up.

https://www.redstate.com/nick-arama/2019/11/24/watch-john-stossel-destroys-climate-change-myths-in-terrific-video/?fbclid=IwAR0Hw5SGkaWj0rKY75yBmo5CWKMV00dMrWHrcAOMYPXgcFWuXZH_riy57EY


I do not know how to post a link just copy and paste and it will show up, I tried it that works.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 01 2019 at 5:43pm
Well, I dissagree on the main point. The science is sound; agreed on by the vast majority of scientists , at least those not funded by fossil fuel companies. Most ecosystems are failing.

But I have to agree with him on this point; our governments can't save us. The damage is already done and no amount of willpower is going to pull us back from the cliff edge; we are already falling.

Humans however are ingenious. I can't see us going extinct, just having a large drop in numbers. (not most preppers) The world is not going to change into another Venus; we are in the goldilocks zone; Venus is not.




For those unwilling to cut and paste here is FluMom's article:   https://www.redstate.com/nick-arama/2019/11/24/watch-john-stossel-destroys-climate-change-myths-in-terrific-video/?fbclid=IwAR0Hw5SGkaWj0rKY75yBmo5CWKMV00dMrWHrcAOMYPXgcFWuXZH_riy57EY

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Worldometers


W PopulationWorldWorld Population by Year
World Population by Year
Year     
World Population
Yearly
Change     Net
Change     Density
(P/Km˛)     Urban
Pop     Urban
Pop %
2019     7,713,468,100     1.08 %     82,377,060     52     4,299,438,618     56 %
2018     7,631,091,040     1.10 %     83,232,115     51     4,219,817,318     55 %
2017     7,547,858,925     1.12 %     83,836,876     51     4,140,188,594     55 %
2016     7,464,022,049     1.14 %     84,224,910     50     4,060,652,683     54 %
2015     7,379,797,139     1.16 %     84,506,374     50     3,981,497,663     54 %
2014     7,295,290,765     1.17 %     84,708,789     49     3,902,831,934     53 %
2013     7,210,581,976     1.19 %     84,753,917     48     3,824,990,329     53 %
2012     7,125,828,059     1.20 %     84,633,758     48     3,747,842,586     53 %
2011     7,041,194,301     1.21 %     84,370,698     47     3,671,423,872     52 %
2010     6,956,823,603     1.22 %     84,056,510     47     3,594,868,146     52 %
2009     6,872,767,093     1.23 %     83,678,407     46     3,516,830,263     51 %
2008     6,789,088,686     1.24 %     83,142,076     46     3,439,719,128     51 %
2007     6,705,946,610     1.24 %     82,428,777     45     3,363,609,560     50 %
2006     6,623,517,833     1.25 %     81,610,806     44     3,289,446,226     50 %
2005     6,541,907,027     1.25 %     80,747,638     44     3,215,905,863     49 %
2004     6,461,159,389     1.25 %     79,974,275     43     3,143,044,892     49 %
2003     6,381,185,114     1.26 %     79,411,926     43     3,071,743,997     48 %
2002     6,301,773,188     1.27 %     79,146,582     42     3,001,808,223     48 %
2001     6,222,626,606     1.29 %     79,132,783     42     2,933,078,510     47 %
2000     6,143,493,823     1.31 %     79,254,768     41     2,868,307,513     47 %
1999     6,064,239,055     1.33 %     79,445,113     41     2,808,231,655     46 %
1998     5,984,793,942     1.35 %     79,748,154     40     2,749,213,598     46 %
1997     5,905,045,788     1.38 %     80,153,837     40     2,690,813,541     46 %
1996     5,824,891,951     1.40 %     80,678,972     39     2,632,941,583     45 %
1995     5,744,212,979     1.43 %     81,062,552     39     2,575,505,235     45 %
1994     5,663,150,427     1.46 %     81,552,881     38     2,518,254,111     44 %
1993     5,581,597,546     1.50 %     82,677,737     37     2,461,223,528     44 %
1992     5,498,919,809     1.56 %     84,630,365     37     2,404,337,297     44 %
1991     5,414,289,444     1.63 %     87,058,383     36     2,347,462,336     43 %
1990     5,327,231,061     1.71 %     89,789,503     36     2,290,228,096     43 %
1989     5,237,441,558     1.79 %     92,015,550     35     2,233,140,502     43 %
1988     5,145,426,008     1.84 %     92,903,861     35     2,176,126,537     42 %
1987     5,052,522,147     1.85 %     91,954,235     34     2,118,882,551     42 %
1986     4,960,567,912     1.84 %     89,646,172     33     2,062,604,394     42 %
1985     4,870,921,740     1.82 %     86,910,119     33     2,007,939,063     41 %
1984     4,784,011,621     1.80 %     84,442,317     32     1,955,106,433     41 %
1983     4,699,569,304     1.78 %     82,182,762     32     1,903,822,436     41 %
1982     4,617,386,542     1.77 %     80,389,780     31     1,854,134,229     40 %
1981     4,536,996,762     1.77 %     78,993,248     30     1,804,215,203     40 %
1980     4,458,003,514     1.77 %     77,497,414     30     1,754,201,029     39 %
1979     4,380,506,100     1.76 %     75,972,599     29     1,706,021,638     39 %
1978     4,304,533,501     1.77 %     75,027,441     29     1,659,306,117     39 %
1977     4,229,506,060     1.80 %     74,839,196     28     1,616,419,308     38 %
1976     4,154,666,864     1.84 %     75,186,258     28     1,577,376,141     38 %
1975     4,079,480,606     1.89 %     75,686,434     27     1,538,624,994     38 %
1974     4,003,794,172     1.94 %     76,013,934     27     1,501,134,655     37 %
1973     3,927,780,238     1.98 %     76,129,993     26     1,462,178,370     37 %
1972     3,851,650,245     2.01 %     75,890,628     26     1,424,734,781     37 %
1971     3,775,759,617     2.04 %     75,322,571     25     1,388,834,099     37 %
1970     3,700,437,046     2.06 %     74,756,419     25     1,354,215,496     37 %
1969     3,625,680,627     2.09 %     74,081,500     24     1,319,833,474     36 %
1968     3,551,599,127     2.09 %     72,829,165     24     1,285,933,432     36 %
1967     3,478,769,962     2.08 %     70,847,332     23     1,252,566,565     36 %
1966     3,407,922,630     2.05 %     68,339,033     23     1,219,993,032     36 %
1965     3,339,583,597     2.00 %     65,605,259     22     1,188,469,224     36 %
1964     3,273,978,338     1.96 %     62,977,329     22     1,157,813,355     35 %
1963     3,211,001,009     1.92 %     60,580,214     22     1,122,561,940     35 %
1962     3,150,420,795     1.89 %     58,577,288     21     1,088,376,703     35 %
1961     3,091,843,507     1.87 %     56,893,759     21     1,055,435,648     34 %
1960     3,034,949,748     1.86 %     55,373,563     20     1,023,845,517     34 %
1959     2,979,576,185     1.84 %     53,889,480     20     992,820,546     33 %
1958     2,925,686,705     1.82 %     52,380,615     20     962,537,113     33 %
1957     2,873,306,090     1.80 %     50,862,808     19     933,113,168     32 %
1956     2,822,443,282     1.78 %     49,423,346     19     904,685,164     32 %
1955     2,773,019,936     1.77 %     48,173,195     19     877,008,842     32 %
1954     2,724,846,741     1.76 %     47,237,781     18     850,179,106     31 %
1953     2,677,608,960     1.78 %     46,747,398     18     824,289,989     31 %
1952     2,630,861,562     1.81 %     46,827,301     18     799,282,533     30 %
1951     2,584,034,261     1.88 %     47,603,112     17     775,067,697     30 %
1927     2,000,000,000                             
1900     1,600,000,000                             
1850     1,200,000,000                             
1804     1,000,000,000                             
1760     770,000,000                             
1700     610,000,000                             
1600     500,000,000                             
1500     450,000,000                             
1400     350,000,000                             
1200     360,000,000                             
1100     320,000,000                             
1000     275,000,000                             
900     240,000,000                             
800     220,000,000                             
700     210,000,000                             
600     200,000,000                             
200     190,000,000                             
-200     150,000,000                             
-500     100,000,000                             
-1000     50,000,000                             
-2000     27,000,000                             
-3000     14,000,000                             
-4000     7,000,000                             
-5000     5,000,000                             
Source: Worldometers (www.Worldometers.info)
From 1950 to current year: elaboration of data by United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. World Population Prospects: The 2019 Revision. (Medium-fertility variant).

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 01 2019 at 9:22pm
Humans are KILLING THE PLANET........

we are changing the chemistry of the biosphere.......


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 01 2019 at 9:36pm

Ad
Environment
World must stop ‘war against nature’, UN chief says ahead of key climate talks
Declaration comes ahead of the summit in Madrid

Isla Binnie
12 hours ago
UN chief says influential countries such as China and US aren’t pulling their weight which is having a detrimental effect on change
UN chief says influential countries such as China and US aren’t pulling their weight which is having a detrimental effect on change ( Getty )
The world must stop a “war against nature” and find more political will to combat climate change, United Nations secretary general Antonio Guterres has said ahead of the start of a two-week global climate summit in Madrid.

Around the world, extreme weather ranging from wildfires to floods is being linked to manmade global warming, putting pressure on the summit to strengthen the implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement on limiting the rise in temperature.


“Our war against nature must stop, and we know that it is possible,” Mr Guterres said ahead of the 2-13 December summit.

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“We simply have to stop digging and drilling and take advantage of the vast possibilities offered by renewable energy and nature-based solutions.”

Cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases – mostly from burning carbon-based fossil fuels – that have been agreed so far under the Paris deal are not enough to limit temperature rises to a goal of between 1.5 and 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels.

Many countries are not even meeting those commitments, and political will is lacking, Mr Guterres said.

President Donald Trump for his part has started withdrawing the US from the Paris Agreement, while the deforestation of the Amazon basin – a crucial carbon reservoir – is accelerating and China has tilted back towards building more coal-fired power plants.

Seventy countries have committed to a goal of “carbon neutrality“ or “climate neutrality” by 2050.

Watch more
Earth may have already hit catastrophic climate change ‘tipping point’
This means they would balance out greenhouse emissions, for instance through carbon capture technology or by planting trees.

But Mr Guterres said these pledges were not enough.

“We also see clearly that the world’s largest emitters are not pulling their weight,” he said, “and without them, our goal is unreachable.”

Support free-thinking journalism and attend Independent events
Last year’s UN climate summit in Poland yielded a framework for reporting and monitoring emissions pledges and updating plans for further cuts.

But sticking points remain, not least over an article on how to put a price on emissions, and so allow them to be traded.

“I don’t even want to entertain the possibility that we do not agree on article 6,” Mr Guterres said. “We are here to approve guidelines to implement article 6, not to find excuses not to do it.”

Reuters

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 01 2019 at 11:14pm
BBC News - Climate change: COP25 talks to open as 'point of no return' in sight
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-50614518
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 07 2019 at 3:02pm
National Geographic Logo

WARMING AT THE POLES WILL SOON BE FELT GLOBALLY IN RISING SEAS, EXTREME WEATHER
PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFFREY KERBY
READ CAPTION
Ice loss, permafrost thaw, fires: Trouble in the Arctic and Antarctic could cause shocks to the world’s weather and sea levels sooner than thought, says a new study.
BY CHERYL KATZ
Eric Post has observed seasons at the same location on the West Greenland tundra for 26 years. Over that time, he’s seen profound changes. When he first started working there, hundreds of caribou covered the hills. Now, he says, the herd is down to around 90.


“You find yourself thinking they’ll be back next spring; numbers will go up again,” Post says, “but year after year goes by and the big groups just aren’t there the way they used to be.”

As Earth trudges steadily toward a dangerously warm future, a new report on the outlook for the polar regions says the Arctic is already there—with consequences on the horizon for everyone.

“There is a real possibility that we will be entering a phase of accelerated Arctic warming in the next two to four decades if mitigation action isn’t taken soon,” says Post, a climate change ecologist at the University of California, Davis.


Post is lead author of the report published today in Science Advances, in which an international group of scientists looks at current and future impacts of polar warming across a range of disciplines.

The Arctic is warming far more quickly than anywhere else on the planet. Temperatures climbed nearly 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 Celsius) in the past decade alone. At the current rate of greenhouse gas emissions, the North is on track to warm 7.2 F (4 C) year-round—and top 12.6 F (7 C) in autumns—by the middle of this century, according to the report. That’s about when the planet as a whole is projected to reach the 3.6 F (2 C) warming often cited as the threshold for disastrous impacts.

(Find out why Earth’s climate systems are heading for dangerous tipping points.)


Already, the High North is seeing unprecedented changes, including drastic ice losses on land and sea, galloping permafrost thaw, raging wildfires, unseasonal storms, earlier springs, and more. Summer sea ice this year shrank to its second lowest extent since satellite measurements began in 1979, while record July heat melted billions of tons of ice off the Greenland ice sheet. Wildfires blazed across millions of acres from Alaska to Siberia.

“Consequences of recent Arctic warming have already been widespread and pronounced, and yet we haven’t even seen what’s expected to be the most rapid phase of warming,” Post says.

Climate 101: Causes and Effects
While both the Arctic and Antarctic are experiencing rising temperatures, thinning glaciers, disturbed ecosystems, and other alarming shifts as heat-trapping fossil fuel emissions build up, changes are sweeping the northern region far faster. The impacts of a warming Arctic will be felt well beyond the high latitudes in the near future, the report warns.

Sea ice losses
One of scientists’ top concerns as the planet warms is the loss of Arctic sea ice. Summer sea ice, which has been shrinking more than 10 percent a decade over the past 40 years, is projected to essentially disappear within 20 to 25 years at the current emissions rate. Some put it even sooner.

Co-author Julienne Stroeve, a specialist in remote sensing of the polar regions with the University of Manitoba in Canada and the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, thinks Arctic warming may already have pushed summer sea ice past its threshold.

“I know it's a dangerous thing to say,” says Stroeve, “but at this point, regardless of what we commit to with CO2 reductions, and the warming that we try to limit things to… we will likely see ice-free summers emerging.”

Her latest work suggests that Arctic sea ice is now shrinking faster than most current climate models project. That ice loss fuels Arctic amplification—the force that’s speeding up northern warming. As the ocean’s protective lid thaws, more sunlight enters the water, causing more warming, leading to yet more ice loss, in a feedback spiral.

Peeling back that ice cover could also unleash more extreme weather on the Northern Hemisphere’s mid-latitudes, including droughts, floods, and heatwaves. Although a topic of current debate among scientists, some studies suggest Arctic warming makes the jet stream weaker and wavier, letting cold polar air reach further south and warm air stretch north.

“The accelerated Arctic warming impacts weather down here in the lower 48 and around the entire Northern Hemisphere by changing the temperature contrast between mid and high latitudes,” explains co-author Michael Mann, a Pennsylvania State University atmospheric scientist.

“That temperature contrast is responsible for the existence of the jet stream, and when it decreases, the jet stream tends to slow down and weather systems linger longer in the same location,” he says.

Mann says the phenomenon has been linked with relentless hot spells like the ones that baked Europe this summer, and brutal cold snaps like the recent “Arctic blast” that froze the eastern and midwestern United States.

Rising concerns
Sea-level rise is another looming concern. Arctic land ice—particularly the vast ice sheet atop Greenland—is thawing faster than current climate models suggest, and could raise sea levels substantially more than the 3 feet projected by the end of the century in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s report released in September.

Arctic permafrost thaw is also escalating, releasing the potent greenhouse gas methane and spiking atmospheric levels, with profound global warming effects.

Wildfires burn near the tundra-taiga transition in Siberia. Such fires are expected to become more common as the permafrost thaws, then dries out.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JEFFREY KERBY
Another recent study projects Arctic wildfire intensity doubling each year as thawing ground dries out.

Meanwhile, warming is already knocking the Arctic’s seasonal clock off-kilter. Spring plant growth is coming earlier and earlier, meaning tundra animals like the caribou at Post’s Greenland research site arrive at their annual birthing grounds after the plants they eat have passed their nutritional peak. Flowers open before the insects that pollinate them can get there, and migrating birds miss the spring flush. The shifts are accelerating, the report says, and in future could exceed ecosystems’ ability to adapt.

Arctic warming also stands to disrupt the marine food web, increase mortality for polar bears and seals, and threaten the livelihoods of the region’s indigenous people. One bright note in the outlook: So far whales seem to be benefitting from range expansion as sea ice recedes.

The Antarctic is not the Arctic
While temperatures are surging in the Arctic—by century’s end, they could soar as much as 23.4 F (13 C) during parts of the year, according to the report—Antarctic warming has been similar to the global average, although some parts are warming much faster.

Both polar regions are changing, says co-author Richard Alley, a Penn State glaciologist and Antarctica specialist. “But it’s not as simple as they all do the same thing. The Arctic is not the Antarctic and the Antarctic is not the Arctic.”

Antarctica is surrounded by the vast Southern Ocean, which is soaking up much of the atmosphere’s excess heat. “And if it goes into the ocean,” says Alley, “then it's not staying in the air.”

Like the Arctic, ice on the southernmost continent is also being eaten away by warming. Major glaciers—most notably the Florida-sized Thwaites—are rapidly retreating, while the floating ice shelves that hold them in place are thinning above and below. Those trends worry scientists.

“Warming of the air or ocean can weaken the ice shelves, and beyond some threshold, they tend to break off,” says Alley.

If ice shelves in West Antarctica failed, and the Thwaites and other glaciers collapsed, sea levels could rise an additional foot or more by 2100—and a whopping 10 feet or more in the following century if irreversible glacier loss tipping points are crossed.

"That's the thing that that really worries us with West Antarctica,” says Alley. “A reasonably small difference in how things evolve could end up making a really big difference in what happens with sea levels."

Antarctic sea ice has waxed and waned. The past two years, however, have seen record autumn lows. Moreover, the warming Southern Ocean could provide a route for invasive species and diseases to reach the isolated continent. And Antarctica’s penguins, some of which are already having to shift their ranges as coastal conditions change, may face widespread displacement in future. The iconic emperor penguins could all but vanish by the end of the century, another new report projects.

The polar outlook is a “generally solid assessment of the changes and how they depend on these emissions scenarios,” says University of Alaska-Fairbanks atmospheric scientist John Walsh, who was not involved with the study. “The article makes the point that even with the low emissions scenario—and a 2 degrees C warmer world is down at the low end of the emissions scenario spectrum—the Arctic is a changed place.”

Cutting fossil fuel emissions can lower or delay Arctic warming by several decades, the authors say.

"In a way, the Arctic is speaking to us," say Post. "The question is whether we are listening."

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 4, 2019
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