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Risks of Getting Flu Vaccine Too Early.

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John L. View Drop Down
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    Posted: September 11 2018 at 3:50pm
From CIDRAP, more evidence as to why you should not get Your flu vaccine too early just so the drug stores can make more money...

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2018/09/study-flu-vaccine-protection-starts-wane-within-weeks

Study: Flu vaccine protection starts to wane within weeks
cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2018/09/study-flu-vaccine-protection-starts-wane-within-weeks
Stephanie Soucheray | News Reporter | CIDRAP News | Sep 11, 2018

Though the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends administration of the flu vaccine by the end of October, a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases suggests that vaccine effectiveness may begin dropping within weeks of administration, adding more evidence of waning protection over the course of a single flu season.

Researchers from Kaiser Permanente Northern California showed that the risk of contracting the flu climbs about 16% for every 28 days after vaccination. That means many people could be less protected during the height of flu season if they get vaccinated at the beginning of September.

The study took place over several flu seasons, from Sep 1, 2010, through Mar 31, 2017, and included participants who were vaccinated with the inactivated influenza vaccine (flu shot) and subsequently tested for influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), used as a negative control outcome, by a polymerase-chain reaction test.

Instead of a more traditional, "case-positive, control-negative" model, this study was designed to determine if the risk of testing positive for influenza, compared to testing negative, increased with time since vaccination.
Results show flu risk doubling as season progresses

The study used the electronic medical records of 44,959 patients who tested positive for influenza within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health care system.

When compared with participants vaccinated 14 to 41 days prior to being tested, persons vaccinated 42 to 69 days prior to being tested had 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11 to 1.55) times the odds of testing positive for any influenza, according to the study authors. The odds ratio (OR) was 2.06 (95% CI: 1.69 to 2.51) for persons vaccinated 154 or more days prior to being tested.

No evidence of waning was found for RSV.

Most of the waning was associated with influenza A protection, the authors said, as that virus strain represented 80% of the confirmed cases included in this study.

The authors also included a model that looks at moving flu vaccination to late November, but they wrote, "Although our results suggest that some number of influenza cases may be averted by delaying vaccination, any changes in recommendations regarding the timing of vaccination should be approached with caution."
Study highlights challenge of evaluating flu vaccine

Other recent studies from the United States, Spain, and the United Kingdom have also shown waning interseasonal flu vaccine effectiveness, but experts warn that changing the timing recommendation is a complicated endeavor.

"My informal sense of the literature [is] that the suggestion is strong enough that if people could reliably get vaccinated the week or two before the flu season starts, they'd be better protected," Marc Lipsitch, PhD, a professor of epidemiology at Harvard University, told CIDRAP News. Lipsitch also penned a commentary on this study. "The more complicated thing is the trade-off between putting it off and not doing it at all," he said.

Lipsitch said the public health risk of people failing to get vaccinated in the course of the year may be too great. In his commentary, he said a multitude of variables including, antigenic drift, and circulating strains, make studying vaccine timing a particularly challenging prospect.

"Better ways to evaluate flu vaccines are also urgently needed," Lipsitch said in his commentary.

See also:

Sep 10 Clin Infect Dis study

Sep 10 Clin Infect Dis commentary
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 12 2018 at 4:52pm
Ok so I got the quad flu shot today. Should I get the High Dose mid December. Can you get two flu shots in a season???
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 12 2018 at 5:11pm
Consensus of medical opinion is that two shots in one year make no difference at all. That, of course, makes no allowance for the difference in additives and strains. If you can stand the dumbed down spiel churned out for the uneducated masses - here it is:

Misconceptions about Flu Vaccines
Can a flu shot give you the flu?

No, a flu shot cannot cause flu illness. Flu vaccines given with a needle are currently made in two ways: the vaccine is made either with a) flu vaccine viruses that have been ‘inactivated’ and are therefore not infectious, or b) with no flu vaccine viruses at all (which is the case for recombinant influenza vaccine). The most common side effects from the influenza shot are soreness, redness, tenderness or swelling where the shot was given. Low-grade fever, headache and muscle aches also may occur.

In randomized, blinded studies, where some people get inactivated flu shots and others get salt-water shots, the only differences in symptoms was increased soreness in the arm and redness at the injection site among people who got the flu shot. There were no differences in terms of body aches, fever, cough, runny nose or sore throat.

    Carolyn Bridges et al. (2000). Effectiveness and cost-benefit of influenza vaccination of healthy working adults: A randomized controlled trial.
    Kristin Nichol et al. (1995). The effectiveness of vaccination against influenza in healthy working adults. New England Journal of Medicine. 333(14): 889-893.

Are any of the available flu vaccines recommended over the others?

For the 2018-2019 flu season, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends annual influenza vaccination for everyone 6 months and older with any licensed age-appropriate flu vaccine including inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV), recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV4) or live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV4) with no preference expressed for any one vaccine over another.
Is it better to get the flu than the flu vaccine?

No. Flu can be a serious disease, particularly among young children, older adults, and people with certain chronic health conditions, such as asthma, heart disease or diabetes. Any flu infection can carry a risk of serious complications, hospitalization or death, even among otherwise healthy children and adults. Therefore, getting vaccinated is a safer choice than risking illness to obtain immune protection.
Do I really need a flu vaccine every year?

Yes. CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for just about everyone 6 months and older, even when the viruses the vaccine protects against have not changed from the previous season. The reason for this is that a person’s immune protection from vaccination declines over time, so an annual vaccination is needed to get the “optimal” or best protection against the flu.
Why do some people not feel well after getting the seasonal flu vaccine?

Some people report having mild reactions to flu vaccination. The most common reaction to the flu shot in adults has been soreness, redness or swelling at the spot where the shot was given. This usually lasts less than two days. This initial soreness is most likely the result of the body’s early immune response reacting to a foreign substance entering the body. Other reactions following the flu shot are usually mild and can include a low grade fever and aches. If these reactions occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1-2 days. The most common reactions people have to flu vaccine are considerably less severe than the symptoms caused by actual flu illness.
What about serious reactions to flu vaccine?

Serious allergic reactions to flu vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it is usually within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination. While these reactions can be life-threatening, effective treatments are available.
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What about people who get a seasonal flu vaccine and still get sick with flu symptoms?

There are several reasons why someone might get a flu symptoms, even after they have been vaccinated against flu.

    One reason is that some people can become ill from other respiratory viruses besides flu such as rhinoviruses, which are associated with the common cold, cause symptoms similar to flu, and also spread and cause illness during the flu season. The flu vaccine only protects against influenza, not other illnesses.
    Another explanation is that it is possible to be exposed to influenza viruses, which cause the flu, shortly before getting vaccinated or during the two-week period after vaccination that it takes the body to develop immune protection. This exposure may result in a person becoming ill with flu before protection from the vaccine takes effect.
    A third reason why some people may experience flu like symptoms despite getting vaccinated is that they may have been exposed to a flu virus that is very different from the viruses the vaccine is designed to protect against. The ability of a flu vaccine to protect a person depends largely on the similarity or “match” between the viruses selected to make the vaccine and those spreading and causing illness. There are many different flu viruses that spread and cause illness among people. For more information, see Influenza (Flu) Viruses.
    The final explanation for experiencing flu symptoms after vaccination is that the flu vaccine can vary in how well it works and some people who get vaccinated may still get sick.

Can vaccinating someone twice provide added immunity?

In adults, studies have not shown a benefit from getting more than one dose of vaccine during the same influenza season, even among elderly persons with weakened immune systems. Except for some children, only one dose of flu vaccine is recommended each season.
Is it true that getting a flu vaccine can make you more susceptible to other respiratory viruses?

There was one study (published in 2012) that suggested that influenza vaccination might make people more susceptible to other respiratory infections. After that study was published, many experts looked into this issue further and conducted additional studies to see if the findings could be replicated. No other studies have found this effect. For example, this article [99 KB, 5 pages] in Clinical Infectious Diseases (published in 2013). It’s not clear why this finding was detected in the one study, but the preponderance of evidence suggests that this is not a common or regular occurrence and that influenza vaccination does not, in fact, make people more susceptible to other respiratory infections.
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Misconceptions about Flu Vaccine Effectiveness

Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) can vary from year to year, by virus type and subtype, and among different age and risk groups. For more information about vaccine effectiveness, visit How Well Does the Seasonal Flu Vaccine Work)?

There are many reasons to get a flu vaccine each year. Below is a summary of the benefits of flu vaccination, and selected scientific studies that support these benefits.

    Flu vaccination can keep you from getting sick with flu.
        Flu vaccine prevents millions of illnesses and flu-related doctor’s visits each year. For example, during 2016-2017, flu vaccination prevented an estimated 5.3 million influenza illnesses, 2.6 million influenza-associated medical visits, and 85,000 influenza-associated hospitalizations.
        In seasons when the vaccine viruses matched circulating strains, flu vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of having to go to the doctor with flu by 30 percent to 60 percent.
    Flu vaccination can reduce the risk of flu-associated hospitalization for children, working age adults, and older adults.
        Flu vaccine prevents tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year. For example, during 2016-2017, flu vaccination prevented an estimated 85,000 flu-related hospitalizations.
        A 2014 study showed that flu vaccine reduced children’s risk of flu-related pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission by 74% during flu seasons from 2010-2012.
        In recent years, flu vaccines have reduced the risk of flu-associated hospitalizations among adults on average by about 40%.
        A 2018 study showed that from 2012 to 2015, flu vaccination among adults reduced the risk of being admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with flu by 82 percent.
    Flu vaccination is an important preventive tool for people with chronic health conditions.
        Vaccination has been associated with lower rates of some cardiac events among people with heart disease, especially among those who had had a cardiac event in the past year.
        Flu vaccination also has been shown in separate studies to be associated with reduced hospitalizations among people with diabetes and chronic lung disease.
    Vaccination helps protect women during and after pregnancy.
        Vaccination reduces the risk of flu-associated acute respiratory infection in pregnant women by up to one-half.
        Getting vaccinated can also protect a baby after birth from flu. (Mom passes antibodies onto the developing baby during her pregnancy.)
            A number of studies have shown that in addition to helping to protect pregnant women, a flu vaccine given during pregnancy helps protect the baby from flu infection for several months after birth, when he or she is not old enough to be vaccinated.
    Flu vaccine can be life-saving in children.
        A 2017 study was the first of its kind to show that flu vaccination can significantly reduce a child’s risk of dying from influenza.
    Flu vaccination has been shown in several studies to reduce severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get sick.
        A 2017 study showed that flu vaccination reduced deaths, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, ICU length of stay, and overall duration of hospitalization among hospitalized flu patients.
        A 2018 study showed that among adults hospitalized with flu, vaccinated patients were 59 percent less likely to be admitted to the ICU than those who had not been vaccinated. Among adults in the ICU with flu, vaccinated patients on average spent 4 fewer days in the hospital than those who were not vaccinated.
    Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, including those who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness, like babies and young children, older people, and people with certain chronic health conditions.

*References for the studies listed above can be found at Publications on Influenza Vaccine Benefits. Also, see the Why Get a Flu Vaccine[237 KB, 2 pages] fact sheet.
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Misconceptions about the Timing of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination
Should I wait to get vaccinated so that my immunity lasts through the end of the season?

CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommend that flu vaccinations begin by the end of October, if possible. However, as long as flu viruses are circulating, it is not too late to get vaccinated, even in January or later. While seasonal flu outbreaks can happen as early as October, most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, although activity can last as late as May. Since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protect against flu virus infection, it is best that people get vaccinated in time to be protected before flu viruses begin spreading in their community. Although immunity obtained from flu vaccination can vary by person, previously published studies suggest that immunity lasts through a full flu season for most people.

There is some evidence, however, that immunity may decline more quickly in older people. For older adults, two vaccine options are available. One of these options is a “high-dose” vaccine, which is designed specifically for people 65 and older. This vaccine contains a higher dose of antigen (the part of the vaccine that prompts the body to make antibody), which is intended to create a stronger immune response in this age group. For more information, see Fluzone® High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Questions and Answers. Another option licensed is an adjuvanted flu vaccine (FLUAD™). FLUAD™ is a trivalent vaccine made with MF59 adjuvant for use in persons aged 65 years and older. (FLUAD™ is the first adjuvanted influenza vaccine marketed in the United States.) For more information, see FLUAD™ Flu Vaccine with Adjuvant.

How long you are immune or your “duration of immunity” is discussed in the ACIP recommendations. While delaying getting of vaccine until later in the fall may lead to higher levels of immunity during winter months, this should be balanced against possible risks, such as missed opportunities to receive vaccine and difficulties associated with vaccinating a large number of people within a shorter time period.
Is it too late to get vaccinated after Thanksgiving (or the end of November)?

No. Vaccination can still be beneficial as long as flu viruses are circulating. CDC recommends that providers begin to offer flu vaccination by the end of October, if possible, but if you have not been vaccinated by Thanksgiving (or the end of November), it can still be protective to get vaccinated in December or later. Flu is unpredictable and seasons can vary. Seasonal flu disease usually peaks between December and March most years, but disease can occur as late as May.
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Misconceptions about Physician Consent for Vaccination
Do pregnant women or people with pre-existing medical conditions need special permission or written consent from their doctor to receive the flu vaccine?

No. There is no recommendation for pregnant women or people with pre-existing medical conditions to seek special permission or secure written consent from their doctor for vaccination if they get vaccinated at a worksite clinic, pharmacy or other location outside of their physician’s office. With rare exception, CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine for everyone 6 months and older, including pregnant women and people with medical conditions.

A variety of influenza vaccine products are available (Table 1). Vaccine providers should be aware of the approved age indications of the vaccine they are using and of any contraindications or precautions. Providers also should appropriately screen all people getting vaccinated for allergies to vaccine components or other contraindications. People who have previously had a severe allergic reaction to influenza vaccine or any of its ingredients should generally not be vaccinated.

There are some people who should not get a flu vaccine without first speaking with their doctor.

These include:

    People who have a moderate-to-severe illness with or without a fever (they should wait until they recover to get vaccinated), and
    People with a history of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (a severe paralytic illness, also called GBS) that occurred after receiving influenza vaccine and who are not at risk for severe illness from influenza should generally not receive vaccine. Tell your doctor if you ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Your doctor will help you decide whether the vaccine is recommended for you.

Pregnant women or people with pre-existing medical conditions who get vaccinated should get the flu shot.

If a person is vaccinated by someone other than their primary health care provider, the vaccinating provider should ensure that the patient and, if possible, the patient’s medical provider have documentation of vaccination.

For a complete list of people who should not get the vaccine before speaking with their doctor, please review the influenza Vaccine Information Statement for the flu shot.
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Misconceptions about “Stomach Flu”
Is the “stomach flu” really the flu?

No. Many people use the term “stomach flu” to describe illnesses with nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. These symptoms can be caused by many different viruses, bacteria or even parasites. While vomiting, diarrhea, and being nauseous or “sick to your stomach” can sometimes be related to the flu — more commonly in children than adults — these problems are rarely the main symptoms of influenza. The flu is a respiratory disease and not a stomach or intestinal disease.


Source:   https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/misconceptions.htm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 12 2018 at 5:23pm
There is also this page https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-dangers-of-taking-2-FLU-shots-in-the-same-season which I could not copy across. On said page a Doc with lots of letters-after-his-name answers that specific question. His answer is: "none."

I would disagree, despite the letters-after-his-name, and qualify that with: "none - for the vast majority of people."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DeepThinker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 13 2018 at 11:59am
What I don't understand is this... everyone risk of getting the flu increases as the flu season progresses. The infection rate for a traditional flu outbreak represents a huge parabolic curve.   I don't think RSV strikes with the same pattern.

So how do we actually know that the vaccine becomes less effective verses this study just simply pointing out that RSV and Influenza outbreaks are different.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DeepThinker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 13 2018 at 12:08pm
Maybe a better study would have been to compare when a person was vaccinated to when the peak of the flu season happened.    The timing of peak flu rates change ever year.   I think this would be more meaningful than simply looking at how long it has been since vaccinated.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John L. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 13 2018 at 12:57pm
     Flu Mom, if I were you I would wait first to see if we get hit with the flu in December like last year and if so not bother with another shot then. If however it does not arrive until late January on (which seems unlikely due to recent reports in already,) then if it was me I would re-inject in early January. One year one of my students got very sick as late as late March. Just telling you what I would do myself, no expert advice intended.
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Deep Thinker. The Respiratory Synctal Virus has a similsr Ro to unvaccinated influenza. It also has an identical method of transmission. Although its suymptoms are far milder than the flu, they are often confused and conflated.

This makes it a great control. To use the flu itself as a control (scientifically the best option) would require a geographical area to be given a placebo vaccine (profoundly unethical).

The method you suggest would yield some valid results but would be the third option (as it would yield less reliable data than an experiment with a control) behind that of the undertaken study.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You out-reasoned me John L. I think your approach beats mine completely for protection levels.

Listen to John L, not me, FluMom.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DeepThinker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 14 2018 at 12:33am
Yes I understand that the R0 is similar but that doesn't mean the outbreaks have similar timing.   As for a matter of fact I think it is very unlikely that they both peak at the same time....   normally when you have a very fast spreading virus they will tend to crowd each other out and you only get one really bad one at a time. However this is all speculation. It would sure be interesting to look at the source data... I be all kinds of interesting patterns can be found.

"profoundly unethical"
Interesting enough this is usually the reason given as why the flu vaccine has not be more thoroughly studied. They say "we know it works so it is unethical to give a placebo".   I don't buy this line of thinking.    Myself I don't normally take the flu shot.    In the name of science I would be willing to do a double blind experiment.   Is it unethical if someone volunteers?

MTA:Yes I agree that it would be highly unethical to give someone a placebo that was excepting the vaccine.(just wanted to be clear)
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No, volunteers would render the tests ethical, but they would also need to move into the vaccine-free areas along with their families. That then creates an ethical grey area, as those doing the studies (who already know that vaccines save lives) would need to be complicit in the witholding of, potentially life saving, vaccines from those too young to chose for themselves. In their shoes, I would not do it. My conscience would not let me.

As for RSV:
"Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics often overlap with influenza epidemics,8,10 and RSV infections have been associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in young children and more recently in older adults.10-14 Like influenza, RSV infections can precipitate both cardiac and pulmonary complications.15-17 Respiratory syncytial virus infections are rarely diagnosed in adults, in part because available rapid antigen-detection tests are insensitive in adults and few tests for RSV are requested for this age group by medical practitioners.16,18 It is likely that some deaths previously attributed to influenza are actually associated with RSV infection.13,14,19" Source:    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/195750
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 15 2018 at 5:04pm
I will consider a second shot in January if Flu Season is really bad. But here is a real corker... My blood pressure the day after I had the shot went down so low I got dizzy when I bent over to shelve books. I was also light headed just standing. I went home at noon and took my blood pressure 101/66 that is low for me. Has anyone heard of blood pressure lowering after a flu shot.

I am on blood pressure meds but never have had problems.
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Not specifically from the flu shot, at least no one I know.


Hubby's BP goes through the roof if he carries an infection, even if it is asymptomatic. Is it possible that you were also harbouring a hideden infection? When the flu shot hit your immune system it may have woken up after a long snooze.
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Doctors warn you should get your flu shot much earlier this year

WAUSAU, Wis. (WSAW)-- The Centers for Disease Control has expressed concerned this flu season has the potential to be rough. Doctors across the country too are now saying getting your flu shot in the next 6 weeks is key to keeping yourself and your family safe.

Infection Control Manager Jeanie Bresnahan at Aspirus Wausau Hospital told NewsChannel 7's Emily Boyer the idea that if you get your flu shot too early, you may end up having to get another one- is false.

"it's always better to get a flu shot even if the match isn't as good because that's the single most important thing we have to keep you from getting the flu" Bresnahan said.

The flu season doesn't normally ramp up until mid-December but doctors are also taking into account the time it takes for the vaccine to become effective at preventing the flu. Research indicates it takes around 2 weeks for the antibodies in the vaccine to full develop.

Officials are also urging prevention this year in part due to how severe last year's flu season was. According to data from the CDC, 180 children died last year due to the flu-- the most since 2014. As for this year, doctors said there's no way of knowing how severe this flu season will be or even what strain of the virus will be the most active.

Last year's vaccine was 30 percent effective. Everyone is hoping this year's will be better.

"I do know that the vaccine for this season-- they have upgraded that vaccine and made some recommendations for what they think may be the circulating virus" Bresnahan said.

In addition to getting vaccinated, experts with the c-d-c and doctor say you can help prevent the spread of the flu by good hand washing, and staying home if you do get sick.

Typical flu symptoms are high fever, body or muscle aches, and a dry cough.
Source:   https://www.wsaw.com/content/news/Doctors-warn-you-should-get-your-flu-shot-much-earlier-this-year-493685261.html
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[By default, there has been a development in the "proof of efficacy" of mass flu vaccinations. the 2017 flu season in Australia was brutal! his year there was a huge uptake of the vaccine and although the circulating strain and vaccine strains are are very similar*, there is a dramatic drop in hospitalisations and deaths.]

Flu vaccination increase contributes to big drop in cases in Victoria
By Kathy Lord

Updated earlier today at 6:27am


The Victorian Government will fund influenza vaccinations for children under five next year after a large increase in immunisation contributed to a dramatic drop in the number of reported flu cases.
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Flu facts

    2017 flu cases - 35,346
    2018 flu cases - 4,953

    1.7 million free doses of vaccine were given in Victoria in 2018 and there have been 85 per cent fewer cases to date
    Flu cases in residential aged care facilities down from 235 in 2017 to 15 in 2018

There were 1.7 million doses of vaccine administered in the state, contributing to an 85 per cent drop in the number of cases this year.

Health Minister Jill Hennessy is cautiously optimistic that with another month to go in the flu season, the trend will continue.

There have been 30,000 fewer flu notifications this year and 564 fewer presentations to hospital emergency departments.
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"We haven't finished the flu season … but we do know that we were inundated last year with cases of influenza," Ms Hennessy said.

Julian Rait, the president of Australian Medical Association (AMA) Victoria, said vaccinations contributed to the big drop.

"I think that the increased vaccination rate certainly contributed to a reduction in cases, if not accounted for them all," Associate Professor Rait said.

Anecdotally there was also a reduction in the rate of severe flu in young children, an indication that vaccinating kids under the age of five for the first time this year was a "wise strategy."

    "It's proven that if the community is engaged with this issue that we can reduce the number of cases," Associate Professor Rait said.

Ms Hennessy said those vaccinations will continue next year but should ultimately be funded by the Federal Government under the national immunisation program.

"The Commonwealth have not moved on that front and we will put our hand up for yet another year to fund that flu vaccination, but ultimately we want to see these things rolled out under the national immunisation program," she said.

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Victorian Government could lodge an application to put it on the national program but had not done so.

Allegra Siciliano was just three years old when she came down with what appeared to be a cold.

Her condition deteriorated dramatically and she was taken to hospital where she was diagnosed with flu.

She was in a coma in intensive care for a week, and all up spent almost six weeks in hospital.

Now in Grade 2, her father Ross Siciliano said she still has rehabilitation to help to improve her gross motor skills.

"We give obviously do it religiously each year [give her the flu vaccine] not just for Allegra but for the entire family," he said.

"Every year, the family, and extended family and friends also get it and try to pass on the message to everyone."
Timing of the jab important

While 2017 was a particularly bad year with 35,346 cases reported compared to 4,953 this year, Ms Hennessy acknowledged the predominance of the H1N1 strain was "less prevalent" this year.

The number of people getting vaccinations in April and May led to some shortages, a problem largely caused by supply issues, Associate Professor Rait said.

"I think there will be a lot to learn this year and I expect that next year there'll be sufficient supplies to meet the demand," he said.

The AMA Victoria president said getting a flu jab at the right time of year was also important.

He said the best time to get a flu jab is in late May or early June so that it is fully effective during the peak time of the season in late August.

"The vaccine wears off over time. It takes a few weeks to reach peak effect, then it reduces in efficacy probably by a rate of around 15 per cent a month," he said.

"We would normally encourage people to have their vaccination given in late May or early June so at least that covers the peak part of the season which is usually late August but also protects them out to September or October."

Source and linka:   http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-23/massive-increase-in-flu-immunisation-leads-to-big-drop-in-cases/10295734

*Although there is less swine flu this year (H1N1)
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2018 at 2:31pm
if they dont want to get the shot why should we bother with backward ignorant people,or their kids if they get sick ,go blind or deaf,(measles)

the thing is we have vaccines for so long 60 odd years the masses have forgotten what things like Measles, Diphtheria ,Polo can do ,i bet most think that these things are like a cold......

and can be cured after the fact...........

most have had a cold thinking its the "Flu"

they very suprised when they get the real thing............

even the "Normal Flu " can kill if you fight it.....

12 Monkeys...............
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2018 at 3:27pm

I know it is a "Darwin Award"* but there are two good arguments against that, Carbon.

1, Infected people spread the flu to others. Some of those other people are extra vulnerable (HIV sufferers, cancer patients, Lupus sufferers, TB patients, the elderley, Those on immunosuppressants, transplantees, COPD sufferers, asthmatics and the extreemly young) they are dependant upon the care, or lack of it, of the Darwin awardsters.

2, The children of the unvaccinated have no say in the choice - deservedly darwinian or not, that is decidedly unfair.

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_Awards
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2018 at 4:07pm
I know Techno,just thought I would shake a few up,try asking young people what diphtheria is.

This link might interest you

http://amp.abc.net.au/article/10295734
12 Monkeys...............
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2018 at 4:20pm
Spot on, Carbon.

I forgot to mention - killing innocent bystanders is a disqualification offence for Darwin awards. So no medals for the anti-vaxers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote carbon20 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2018 at 4:48pm
9news.com.au: 'We were not sure if she would make it': Family's flu vaccine plea.
https://www.9news.com.au/2018/09/23/21/12/victoria-free-flu-shots
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FluMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2018 at 6:59pm
In the U.S.A. we have a dog named Balto that reminds all of us what diphtheria is. If you can get the movie rent it. People who do not vaccinate or wear their seat belt as my son says, "Will fall to natural selection" If they do not vaccinate or wear their seat belt and die oh well, to bad, too sad.
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