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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

The Link Between Viruses And Cancer

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    Posted: August 05 2018 at 2:44am
It has become obvious in recent years that there is a link between several viruses and cancer.  HPV clearly causes head, neck and cervical cancer.  Epstein Barr virus (mononeucleosis, glandular fever) makes some cells immortal and that is a general cancer risk factor.  HTLV1 causes a type of lukemia, Hepatitis raises the risk of liver cancer and HIV produces a wide range of types of the disease.

Carfbon and I have had an enlightening chat about the virus-cancer link and the more I think about it, the more I am convinced that this link is huge and possibly under-explored/missunderstood.

So now another article has emerged, I have a great excuse to open a thread on the subject.  This one concludes a possible link between a virus and obesity, but to quote it: "Wilmore Webley, from the University of Massachusetts, looked at adenovirus-36 prevalence in obese woman who had breast cancer.

Presenting his study at the conference of the American Society of Microbiology, he said: “Adenovirus-36 was detected more frequently in cells from women with higher body mass indexes.”"  I can't help but wonder if the reporters missed the point here.  We know that statistically obesity raises the risk of cancer, perhaps this virus is the reason for that.


Anyway Here is the article:

Weight loss: Got a cold? Infection with this virus could stop you from shedding the pounds

WEIGHT loss is something many of us try to achieve, and often struggle with. But, what if an infection was stopping us losing weight? Shocking scientific research revealed this virus, causing cold-like symptoms, could be responsible.


Weight loss could be made more difficult by an adenovirus-36 infection.

The virus, whose prevalence is “unknown” according to the World Health Organisation, causes cold-like symptoms, including a sore throat, fever and lung problems.

Several studies have shown a possible link between the virus and weight gain.

A review paper published in the journal Viruses described adenovirus-36 as a “possible risk factor” for obesity.

“In humans, adenovirus-36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of adenovirus-36 increases in relation to the body mass index,” researchers said.

Studies on animals have shown that adenovirus causes them to gain weight.

Writing in the Journal of Nutrition, researcher Nikhil Dhurandhar who first began research into adenovirus-36, found infected marmosets had a “threefold body weight gain” than uninfected animals of the same species.

“These studies illustrate the fat-promoting effects of adenovirus-36,” the researchers wrote in the conclusion.

Infection with adenovirus-36 can be identified using several scientific techniques including antigen detection and serology, according to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“Even if a person has adenovirus infection, it does not necessarily mean it is causing the person’s particular illness,” they continued. “Some people can shed the virus for weeks or longer and have no symptoms.”

Obesity is a risk factor for several possibly life-shortening conditions including cancer, diabetes and heart problems.

Wilmore Webley, from the University of Massachusetts, looked at adenovirus-36 prevalence in obese woman who had breast cancer.

Presenting his study at the conference of the American Society of Microbiology, he said: “Adenovirus-36 was detected more frequently in cells from women with higher body mass indexes.”

Continuing, he claimed vaccines should be offered to help protect against the virus, and possibly breast cancer.

“Vaccines against obesogenic adenoviruses might reduce the risk of breast cancer in specific subsets of susceptible women,” he said.

To avoid an adenovirus-36 infection, the CDC recommended maintaining good personal hygiene.

“Wash your hands often with soap and water,” they said.

“Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.

“Avoid close contact with people who are sick.”

You could lose weight by eating supplement glucomannan.


Source:   https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/997456/weight-loss-virus-adenovirus-obesity


I would really appreciate your thoughts on this, folk.

Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 15 2018 at 2:48am
Among the hidden effects of viruses, this turned up:

Link between common 'harmless' virus and cardiovascular damage

Date:
    August 13, 2018
Source:
    University of Sussex
Summary:
    Researchers have found an unexpectedly close link between a herpes virus and the occurrence of immune cells damaging cardiovascular tissue.
Researchers from Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) have found an unexpectedly close link between a herpes virus and the occurrence of immune cells damaging cardiovascular tissue.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a very common virus similar to the herpes virus that causes cold sores and is generally considered harmless. The immune system usually controls the virus and most people don't even realise they have it.

The work conducted under the supervision of Prof Florian Kern, Chair of Immunology at BSMS, shows that clinically relevant numbers of a specific type of immune cells only arise when infection with CMV is present.

The cells in question (known as CD28null CD4 T-cells) had long been known to be involved in damaging the arteries around the heart, but it was previously assumed that this accumulation of cells was a natural consequence of aging.

The work also shows that certain tissue types, which are determined genetically, make individuals more susceptible to having large numbers of these cells.

Dr Alejandra Pera, Lead Author on the paper, which has been published in Theranostics Journal, said: "While we had previously been aware of a link between these immune cells and cardiovascular damage, this study is the first to show that sufficient numbers to be damaging only occur in the presence of this infection."

Prof. Kern commented: "Our work suggests that Cytomegalovirus infection is an important clinical factor to be considered in coronary heart disease and advanced atherosclerosis, and raises the possibility that treatment of the virus may be effective in the management or even prevention of coronary heart disease in a tangible proportion of patients. Tissue type might help identify those individuals most at risk."

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Sussex. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

    Alejandra Pera, Stefano Caserta, Fabio Albanese, Pinar Blowers, George Morrow, Nadia Terrazzini, Helen E Smith, Chakravarthi Rajkumar, Bernhard Reus, James R Msonda, Murielle Verboom, Michael Hallensleben, Rainer Blasczyk, Kevin A Davies, Florian Kern. CD28null pro-atherogenic CD4 T-cells explain the link between CMV infection and an increased risk of cardiovascular death. Theranostics, 2018; 8 (16): 4509 DOI: 10.7150/thno.27428

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University of Sussex. "Link between common 'harmless' virus and cardiovascular damage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 August 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180813104227.htm>.

My ource:   https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180813104227.htm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 15 2018 at 11:45am
Absence of proof is not proof of absence.
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