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UK, West Country: Scarlet Fever

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    Posted: December 07 2019 at 8:03am
Scarlet fever outbreak confirmed with new cases in Devon and Somerset

Public Health England has said there have been fresh cases within the past week

ByPhilippa Jenkins

    11:15, 7 DEC 2019

There has been a fresh outbreak of scarlet fever in the South West during the past week.

Seven cases of the disease have been confirmed across Devon, Somerset and Bath, according to figures released by Public Health England.

Two people have contracted the disease in East Devon, one in North Devon and a further two in Torbay.

Three people have also been diagnosed in Bath and North East Somerset, with another three contracting the illness in South Somerset, just over the Devon border, and a further isolated case in Sedgemoor.

It is the second week running that seven new cases of scarlet fever have been reported across the region, bringing the total number of people diagnosed in the past fortnight to 14.

In contrast, the previous four weeks had seen 15 confirmed cases.

There have been further outbreaks across the West Country, with three new cases in Wiltshire in the last week, while two others have suffered with scarlet fever in Bristol.

The symptoms of scarlet fever include a sore throat, headache and fever accompanied by a characteristic pink red rash that feels like sandpaper.

Your GP can usually diagnose scarlet fever by looking at the rash. Sometimes they may use a cotton bud to remove a bit of saliva from the throat so it can be tested.

Your GP will prescribe antibiotics (or liquid for young children) to take for five or 10 days.

Scarlet fever usually clears up within a week, although the skin may peel for a few weeks after the other symptoms have passed.

The infection is contagious from before the symptoms appear, until:

24 hours after starting antibiotic treatment

up to two or three weeks later if you don't take antibiotics

Scarlet fever is contagious. It's spread in the tiny droplets found in an infected person's breath, coughs and sneezes.

You can be infected if the droplets get into your mouth, nose or eyes – either by being in close contact with an infected person, or by touching something that has droplets on it.

keep your child away from nursery or school for at least 24 hours after starting antibiotic treatment – adults should stay off work for at least 24 hours after starting treatment

cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze – throw away used tissues immediately

wash your hands with soap and water often, especially after using or disposing of tissues

avoid sharing utensils, cups and glasses, clothes, baths, bed linen, towels or toys


Souurce:   https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/local-news/scarlet-fever-outbreak-confirmed-new-3618911
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 07 2019 at 11:11am
[Technophobe:   Apparently the UK is experiencing an upswing in cases lately.]

Scarlet fever outbreak as 'hundreds of cases' hit UK - here's how many in your area

The Victorian-era infection is making a comeback as multiple new cases are reported across the UK with a fresh outbreak of the 'old world' illness across the UK.

ByTalia Shadwell
Stephen D'Albiac

14:08, 7 DEC 2019Updated15:41, 7 DEC 2019

Hundreds of people have been diagnosed with Scarlet Fever as the 'old world' disease continues to make a frightening comeback across the UK.

The condition that caused misery for Victorian-era children is making a comeback after it was all but eradicated in Britain thanks to a century of medical advances and improved hygiene.

The highly-contagious infection, named for its hallmark red rash, mostly afflicts young children but is not as serious as it once was as it is it able now to be treated with antibiotics.

Hundreds of cases of scarlet fever have been reported across England and Wales in recent weeks, with almost double the amount of new infections in one week than the numbers recorded six weeks ago.

Have you or your child been diagnosed with scarlet fever? Email webnews@mirror.co.uk.
The characteristic red rash that is a symptom of scarlet fever (Image: NHS)

Health officials' figures recorded 450 cases in England and 30 in Wales in the week ending December 1.

The highest numbers of cases were recorded in Cumbria, Yorkshire, London, Derbyshire, Buckinghamshire and the South East of England.

Public Health England recorded a dramatic rise in reported cases between 2013 when there were 4,366 cases of scarlet fever, and 2016 when that number skyrocketed 17,829.

The British Medical Journal (BMJ) last year remarked upon the return of Scarlet Fever , noting it was once again on the rise after years of decline.

The journal's April 2018 article said current rates in England had reached the highest for 50 years, affecting all parts of the country.

Outbreaks were most common in nurseries and schools, and the majority of patients infected were aged around four.

The BMJ attributed the increase to a new and virulent strain of scarlet fever.

During the poverty-stricken Victorian era the infection forced children into long, isolated convalescences in hospital, as the disease illed up to 20,000 children a year.
Scarlet fever predominantly affects young children (file photo) (Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Families were often tragically forced to burn their clothes, bedding and toys after the death of a child to avoid the fever's deadly spread.

Death from scarlet fever today is incredibly rare, as the NHS assuring that while in the past scarlet fever, which usually begins with a Streptococcus A infection, was a very serious illness for children - antibiotics have made it less common and easier to treat.

Scarlet Fever is not the only Victorian-era disease making a comeback.

Health authorities have also noted the return of respiratory illness tuberculosis and sexually transmitted disease gonorrhoea.
How many cases of scarlet fever are in you area?

Tyne and Wear - 13

North East unitary authorities- 2

Cumbria - 105

Greater Manchester - 39

Lancashire - 9

Merseyside - 36

North West Unitary Authorities - 16

North Yorkshire - 53

South Yorkshire - 12

West Yorkshire - 24

Yorkshire and the Humber unitary authorities - 7

Derbyshire - 59

Leicstershire - 28

Lincolnshire- 2

Northamptonshire - 7

Nottinghamshire - 9

East Midlands unitary authorities- 7

West Midlands - 47

Staffordshire - 9

Warwickshire - 1

Worcestershire - 5

West Midlands unitary authorities- 1

Cambridgeshire - 43

Essex - 10

Hertfordshire - 9

Norfolk - 7

Suffolk - 4

East of England unitary authorities - 5

London - 54

Outer London - 36

Buckinghamshire 53

East Sussex - 3

Hampshire - 13

Kent - 10

Oxfordshire - 6

Surrey - 2

West Sussex - 6

South East - 53

South East Unitary authorities - 8

Devon - 23

Dorset - 1

Gloucestershire -5

Somerset - 4

South West unitary authorities- 11

Wales - 30

Figures- Public Health England
What are the symptoms of scarlet fever?

The symptoms of scarlet fever include a sore throat , headache and fever accompanied by a characteristic pink red rash that feels like sandpaper.

Your GP can usually diagnose scarlet fever by looking at the rash. Sometimes they may use a cotton bud to remove a bit of saliva from the throat so it can be tested.

Your GP will prescribe antibiotics (or liquid for young children) to take for five or 10 days.



Source:   https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/scarlet-fever-breaks-out-england-21044440
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Technophobe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 02 2020 at 3:04pm
Scarlet fever cases double across Somerset and Bath as fresh outbreak hits county

Warnings have been issued by Public Health England

18:18, 2 JAN 2020

People across Somerset and Bath have been urged to be aware of the symptoms of scarlet fever after a huge outbreak of the illness across the county over the Christmas period.

A total of 25 cases were confirmed across the county in the final two weeks of December, according to figures released by Public Health England .

It represents a huge rise in the number of cases seen across Somerset - which had seen 14 people diagnosed with the bacterial infection in the previous two weeks .

Ten people caught the infection in Bath and North East Somerset alone over Christmas, with a further five cases being reported in North Somerset and five in Mendip.

There were two cases in South Somerset and Taunton Deane, with a single case of scarlet fever reported in Sedgemoor.

Six people caught scarlet fever in Wiltshire during the festive period, while there were four fresh confirmed cases in Dorset.

A further seven people have been diagnosed with the illness in Bristol.

The symptoms of scarlet fever include a sore throat, headache and fever accompanied by a characteristic pink red rash that feels like sandpaper.

Your GP can usually diagnose scarlet fever by looking at the rash. Sometimes they may use a cotton bud to remove a bit of saliva from the throat so it can be tested.

Your GP will prescribe antibiotics (or liquid for young children) to take for five or 10 days.

Scarlet fever usually clears up within a week, although the skin may peel for a few weeks after the other symptoms have passed.

The infection is contagious from before the symptoms appear, until:

    24 hours after starting antibiotic treatment
    up to two or three weeks later if you don't take antibiotics

Scarlet fever is contagious. It's spread in the tiny droplets found in an infected person's breath, coughs and sneezes.


Source:   https://www.somersetlive.co.uk/news/somerset-news/scarlet-fever-cases-double-across-3700761
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