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Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic

WINTER HEAT

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2006 at 8:41pm
Great idea Daydream. We have used the kind you buy at the store in the past. Guess they will be out of those! Do you use the recycled paper egg cartons, and then just rip it off? We have found that keeping our wood stove going is very easy. It keeps the coals for a long time. It was definitely  the best forward looking investment that we made. We have been able to heat the whole house. I also like the way it looks. We got one of the off white porcelain ones that looks very European.  Matches my decor quite well. When i look at it sort of disguises the fact that we have gone SURVIVALIST!!! It looks very pretty tucked into my brick fireplace.  Friends remark how pretty it is, they have no idea it was a BF investment!!!
 
We also bought a few Mr. Heater Buddy heaters. They work of of one or two small propane cylinders. The larger model has a fan run with 4 D cell batteries. The run for quite a while, and each unit has a low oxygen shut of system. They are approved for use indoors. That is only with the 1 lb cylinders though. You can hook it up to a twenty lb tank, but you need a hose and must keep the tank outside.  We bought a bunch of cases of fuel to use for the heater, as well as cooking. We are having carbon monoxide detectors installed into our security system which will run on solar back up.
I do know that they sell battery ones as well.  I think this is a good precaution to take with using propane in the house!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daydreamer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 21 2006 at 1:43pm
Sorry I didn't get back to this one sooner Mary Kay. We fill each of them enough to completely cover the sawdust. We've never stirred them before. I just make sure the all the sawdust is covered on the top with wax. As it hardens you can see where you missed and just pour a little more on that area.
 
These fire starters have worked well for me for several years. I hate having to start a fire with small twigs and such. I can but I'm lazy and don't like to take the time.
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 01 2006 at 6:39am
Daydreamer, that sounds like a neat idea.
Do you fill each with enough wax to entirely coat the sawdust? Do you stir it?
I've got plenty of old wax from candles so this is a great cheap way to keep warm.
Thanks! : )

Mary Kay
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daydreamer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 01 2006 at 3:52am
We don't have access to pine cones here unless we buy them at a store so we make our own fire starters. We take a cardboard egg carton. Fill up each section with dry sawdust (from when we are cutting wood). Then we take a cheap candle and melt it down. We pour the liquid wax over the sawdust in each of the sections. Let it dry and when you need one, you just break off a section and there you do. They burn for a long time.
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 28 2006 at 8:05pm

This reminds me of looking for a house last week. The first house was beautiful, but had no fireplace so I didn't buy it. The next had a gas fireplace so I skipped it as well.

There's nothing more efficent and sensible than a woodstove. We used ours for 20 years of winters and it heated our home quite well, plus saved us about $500.00 a year in heating bills. It has well paid for itself.

Daydreamer, great idea about the extra firewood and chainsaw fuel............I forgot about that!

Dang, there's just too much stuff to remember!

I did store up a huge bag of pine cones, ....great fire starters. Also any recycling bin is a good resource for newspaper to wrap the pine cones with. I usually find dozens of unused papers that stores throw away. {Don't touch the stuff that's been used.}

Mary Kay
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mississipp Mama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 28 2006 at 6:54pm
  Hope I would rather take my chances in the winter with a wood burning stove.  If you can afford to have it converted I would.  The less dependent we are on the system the better off we will be.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daydreamer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 28 2006 at 1:56pm
 We have heated with wood for years now so we have an older cast iron wood stove. It is a Timberline model that has two doors that swing open in the front. It has a flat top on it and I have used it to cook on in past winters when the power went out.
This woodstove heats the majority of the house but we can block off rooms that wouldn't need heat. We can also move a mattress into the livingroom for sleeping.
The one thing that we need to keep on hand is more fuel for the chainsaw (we cut our own wood) and extra parts for the chainsaw. Plus it wouldn't hurt to get extra wood stacked up.
Don't put off tomorrow what you can PREP today
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Spoon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 28 2006 at 8:05am

Hope,

Most utilities require daily monitoring and maintenance.  How many essential personnel will show up for work during a raging H2H pandemic?  I'm not sure myself... but I have to believe it will be, at best, a skeleton crew.  Areas that are served electricity underground have a better chance of surviving maintenance issues.

We have utility poles and a butt-load of trees.  No gas service but plenty of grill propane.  I also converted my fireplace to a wood stove, added basic solar power to run the fans, and will store about 4-5 cords of wood for next winter.

It's not so much the apocalypse... but the credit card bills ;-)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hope Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 28 2006 at 12:07am

We have gas and electric at our home.  What are the chances that this will not be available during a pandemic in the US?  Should we really be stock piling wood with the thought of converting our gas fireplaces?

Hope
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chuck-91 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2006 at 6:57pm

I have recently purchased a number of propane items. Two lanterns, 2 burner stove, 1 burner stove, indoor catalytic heater, and all maner of hoses, y connectors, fittings and 4 20 lb propane tanks and 2 cases of one lb tanks

Many years ago when I worked with plumbing and high pressure pumping systems we always used Teflon tape on the threads at the joints to eliminate leaks by making the threads fit tighter. |What I cant seem to find out is if this is a good idea with propane systems. Sure dont want flamable gas leaks. I know u can find leaks with soapy water but would rather not have them to start with. The teenagers and managers at the sporting goods and plumbing stores were singularly ignorant and/or unhelpful. Anybody out there know if this is a good idea or dangerous or unnecessary or what???    Please, no guessing, knlowledge only.  By the way I was able to buy a handy little fitting at the Harbor Freight store for refilling 1lb disposable cylinders from 20 lb or larger tanks.  cost about $16.00. Also would appreciate any other insights on using propane fuled devices as I never have been much on recreational camping.( burned out on it in the Marine Corps I guess)  Semper Fi !

Those who will not learn from history are condemned to repeat it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mortgageman99 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2006 at 6:53pm

I apologize if anyone has posted about this before. 

A cheap way to keep warm...buy a fire blanket.  These are the kind you get in the case there is a fire and you need to shield yourself.

From experience in emergency management, fire blankets are great and can be inexpensive.  A good one utilize your own body heat to keep a steady temperature under the blanket. 

Chris

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 19 2006 at 4:09pm
Get a hot water bottle from any drug-store. Made out of rubber, cost about $6 and last pretty much forever. Fill it about 2/3 with boiling water, push the air out (very important!!) and seal it tight with the stopper. I'm from Europe initially and everyone uses them. You'll be nice and toasty in no time ! Also perfect for anytime someone has fever-chills.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 13 2006 at 8:11am

I will be using the following amoung other things such as the Nuwick Candle: (If you want more heat just put another wick in it or it can be used to cook with)

Example: Can get just the blanket kind or: 

A special design blanket or poncho that utilizes the proven thermal and weather protective benefits of the original Space® Brand all-weather blanket material. Contoured hood fully protects ones head, and fitted hand inserts all make for a light compact design. 5’ x 6’ in Olive Drab. Reinforced and center grommeted with all edges bound. Great ground cover, retains 80% body heat, lightweight, can use as a solar shade, and much more! Made in the USA.

http://www.majorsurplusnsurvival.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?S creen=PROD&Product_Code=112699&Category_Code=211



Edited by KillerFlu.net
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fritz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 12 2006 at 5:16pm
Ella, you could use one of those campfire popcorn poppers (cleaned really well or unused I would think or you will be dreaming of popcorn) and fill it with hot embers or hot coals and place it between the sheets as a bed warmer just like they did in colonial times. The popper is metal and the handle is wooden.
"I am only one; but still I am one, I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." -- Hellen Keller
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ella Fitzgerald Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 11 2006 at 11:20pm

I not so much worried for this winter as I am for next. I'm in the south so we have decent temps especially this year.

I have heard of stories of using hot rocks in bed to keep warm. I've also concluded that if we are without electricity and a cold front comes through then I'm going to confine the family to one room lined with down comforters on the walls and ceiling. I've noticed that my closet is always one of warmest rooms in the house. It is lined with clothes. Heck this could become our "warm room". Small spaces warm up with 4 bodies in it pretty quickly. I'm too 'chicken'  to have warm bricks touching anything flamable so maybe I could find a metal pan to put them in to keep the air warm.

Heck with natural gas prices I might as well start now and save money to buy rations.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chefmom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 11 2006 at 10:57pm
my mom did that with bricks wrapped in newspaper and put them in the foot of our beds during a blizzard when we had no power for a week in 1978. I still remember how toasty my feet were!
May God protect us all.       
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 11 2006 at 10:51pm

I just purchased a heavy duty down comforter for half price, $150.00, as it's February. It should keep you toasty warm. A hat and down slippers can keep in alot of body heat.
One winter we had a severe ice storm, electricity was out, our fireplace sent 80% of the heat up the chimmey, we were so cold, so we took a few large stones, heated them in our fireplace, and placed them in coffee cans, they gave off lots of heat, drastic but effective. When you're very cold, any heat helps. I believe in the old days folks put them in their beds!

MK

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Spoon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2006 at 9:40am

I added a Caframo Ecofan 802 to the top of my stove.  It creates DC current from heat.  It starts turning at 150 degrees.  (full speed, 150 CFM, around 400 degrees)

It really works!  I'm thinking of getting another one.

It's not so much the apocalypse... but the credit card bills ;-)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Deej Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2006 at 9:20am
we have been using a barrel stove for years at work, now have one at home, works great, husband welded a plate on top to put kettle for steam, can also cook on top if needed.  whatever you do, just make sure wood is dry   ( look for cracks in logs ) if its too wet or not cured it can cause buildup that can lead to a fire.  and please have your chimney checked by a prof. just to be sure its ok...
dee
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Angel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 31 2006 at 8:02am
Don't forget to stock up on matches!  I have been buying all I find.
Angel
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