Click to Translate to English Click to Translate to French  Click to Translate to Spanish  Click to Translate to German  Click to Translate to Italian  Click to Translate to Japanese  Click to Translate to Chinese Simplified  Click to Translate to Korean  Click to Translate to Arabic  Click to Translate to Russian  Click to Translate to Portuguese  Click to Translate to Myanmar (Burmese)

PANDEMIC ALERT LEVEL
123456
Forum Home Forum Home > Coronavirus Pandemic: Prepping Forums > Medical Intervention & Prevention
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - FDA Safety Update: Asthma Medications
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Online Discussion: Tracking new emerging diseases and the next pandemic since 2005; Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic Discussion Forum.

FDA Safety Update: Asthma Medications

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: FDA Safety Update: Asthma Medications
    Posted: May 21 2008 at 9:00pm
Any problems with Flovent? My hubby just started this med.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 21 2008 at 10:35pm
Originally posted by FluMom FluMom wrote:

Any problems with Flovent? My hubby just started this med.

FluMOM,  I am not in the medical field. I googled Fluvent possible problems and found these two sites, hope this helps. Annie

There are 97 ratings for the drug: flovent in the Askapatient database.  http://askapatient.com/viewrating.asp?drug=20548&name=FLOVENT

Patientsville.com  FLOVENT Safety Questions, FLOVENT Answers

 
 
 
 
Back to Top
jacksdad View Drop Down
Executive Admin
Executive Admin
Avatar

Joined: September 08 2007
Location: San Diego
Status: Offline
Points: 46746
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jacksdad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 31 2008 at 9:19pm
Wow. People were really eating the capsules? That's scary.
It reminds me of a story about a smoker who was using prescription nicotine patches. When he went back to the doctor for a follow up, he complained that he'd run out of space. When he took his shirt off, he was covered in them. Apparently he didn't realize that you were supposed to take the old ones off...
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 02 2008 at 8:49am
Albuterol Inhalers: Time to Transition
Albuterol is a quick-relief medication that's used to open up the airways so that it's easier to breathe. The medication is used by people with certain airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a group of lung diseases that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

One method of delivering albuterol is the metered dose inhaler, a hand-held device that delivers a specific amount of medication directly into the lungs. Traditionally, inhalers have contained chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), a type of propellant that helps the albuterol reach the lungs. But inhalers with CFCs are being phased out because they are harmful to the environment.

Here are facts you should know about switching from your CFC-propelled albuterol inhaler to inhalers that contain propellants called hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs).

CFCs deplete the ozone layer.

CFCs deplete ozone high up in the stratosphere--the part of the earth's atmosphere that protects us from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. In the stratosphere, the ozone layer serves as a shield that absorbs ultraviolet radiation and keeps it from reaching the earth's surface. CFCs are among the substances that damage the ozone layer. This leads to higher levels of ultraviolet B radiation, which has negative effects, including increases in skin cancers and cataracts. Under an international agreement, the United States, along with almost all countries of the world, agreed to phase out CFCs and other ozone-depleting substances.

CFC-propelled albuterol inhalers will no longer be available after Dec. 31, 2008.

In accordance with an FDA Final Rule and under the authority of the Clean Air Act of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, no CFC-propelled albuterol inhalers can be produced, marketed, or sold in the United States after Dec. 31, 2008. Manufacturers have been increasing production of HFA-propelled albuterol inhalers so that sufficient supplies exist to replace the CFC-containing inhalers. If you haven't done so already, you should talk with your health care professional about switching to an HFA-propelled albuterol inhaler.

Albuterol inhalers containing HFAs deliver the same medicine, but there are some differences.

The HFA-propelled albuterol inhalers are still convenient and have been shown to be safe and effective in studies with patients. But you may find that the spray from an HFA inhaler tastes and feels different than the spray from the CFC-propelled albuterol inhalers. The spray from an HFA inhaler may feel less forceful, but this does not mean that the medication is not working.

Cleaning and priming your HFA inhaler are especially important.

Cleaning and priming helps prevent medication build-up and blockages, and ensures that the inhaler works properly. Priming an inhaler involves shaking it well and then releasing test sprays into the air. Be sure to hold the inhaler away from your face so that you don't get medication in your eyes. Each inhaler has specific instructions for cleaning and priming that you should follow. Refer to the patient information that accompanies the product.

Four alternative HFA-propelled inhalers are approved by FDA.

There are four products available that can be used to replace your CFC-propelled albuterol inhaler:

  • Proair HFA Inhalation Aerosol (Ivax Corp.)
  • Proventil HFA Inhalation Aerosol (Schering-Plough)
  • Ventolin HFA Inhalation Aerosol (GlaxoSmithKline)
  • Xopenex HFA Inhalation Aerosol (Sepracor)

While they have all been shown to be effective, there are some differences between the products. You may need to talk with your health care professional and try different inhalers to find the product that is right for you.

For More Information

Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs)
www.fda.gov/cder/mdi/default.htm

FDA Safety Update: Asthma Medications
www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/asthmameds051308.html

FDA's Web Page on Eliminating Ozone-depleting Substances from Metered-Dose Inhalers
www.fda.gov/cder/mdi/albuterol.htm

Date Posted: May 30, 2008

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 01 2008 at 11:35am
FDA Takes Action on Injectable Colchicine
 
Millions of people use albuterol inhalers to help treat the wheezing that occurs with asthma, emphysema and other airway diseases. These inhalers have traditionally used propellants called CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) to help push albuterol into the lungs. But that's changing.

Because CFCs damage the atmosphere's ozone layer, inhalers that use this ingredient won't be available after December 31, 2008 due to an international agreement to help protect the environment. Under this agreement, the United States and most other countries have agreed to phase out CFCs and other ozone-depleting substances.

This means that people will have to switch from CFC inhalers to those that use a different propellant, called HFA (hydrofluoroalkane). This switch will have to happen before the end of 2008. Here are some things to keep in mind:

Patients who still have CFC inhalers should talk with their health care professional as soon as possible about switching to an HFA-propelled inhaler. There are three currently approved HFA albuterol inhalers:

• Proair HFA Inhalation Aerosol
• Proventil HFA Inhalation Aerosol
• Ventolin HFA Inhalation Aerosol

Another approved HFA inhaler that contains levalbuterol, a medicine similar to albuterol:

• Zopenex HFA Inhalation Aerosol

Each of these four inhalers is a safe and effective replacement for a CFC albuterol inhaler. But there are some differences between these products, so patients may need to try several inhalers to find the one that is right for them.

Patients may also notice that using an HFA inhaler is different from a CFC one. The spray from an HFA inhaler may taste different and the force of the spray may feel softer, but that does not mean the inhaler is broken or that the medication isn't working.

Finally, cleaning and priming are especially important for an HFA inhaler in order to prevent medication build-up and blockage. Each inhaler has different priming, cleaning and drying instructions, so be sure to read and follow the patient information that comes with the product.

Additional Information:

FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Information on the Elimination of Chlorofluorocarbon-containing (CFC) Albuterol MDIs and Other Ozone-Depleting Drug Products. May 30, 2008.
http://www.fda.gov/cder/mdi/albuterol.htm

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down