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Now tracking the new emerging South Africa Omicron Variant

Human SwineFlu in US

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Dutch Josh View Drop Down
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    Posted: August 07 2022 at 11:24pm

[url]https://www.coronaheadsup.com/america/usa/west-virginia/swine-flu-first-human-infection-from-pigs-in-the-us-in-2022/[/url] or https://www.coronaheadsup.com/america/usa/west-virginia/swine-flu-first-human-infection-from-pigs-in-the-us-in-2022/

The CDC has reported the first human infection with a flu virus that usually spreads in pigs this year. There have been reports of respiratory illness among other people who attended the same agricultural event.

The person had direct contact with pigs at an agricultural fair, where pigs tested positive for flu A.

Recent reports of an increase in swine flu outbreaks in pigs in the U.S. suggest the risk of exposure and infection with these viruses may be higher than usual this fair season, which can last into the fall. CDC recommends people take precautions around swine, including in the fair setting.

The first variant flu virus infection of 2022 was reported by West Virginia and occurred in a person younger than 18 years who participated in an agricultural fair and had contact with pigs. An investigation is still ongoing but findings to date include:

  • The infected person was not hospitalized and is recovering from their illness.
  • The variant virus is a flu A H3N2v virus, based on RT-PCR testing done at CDC.
  • Pigs at this fair tested positive for flu A.
  • There have been reports of respiratory illness among other people who attended the same agricultural event. Specimens from other patients are being forwarded to CDC for additional testing.
  • To date, no person-to-person spread of this virus has been confirmed.

CDC Confirms First Human Infection with Flu Virus from Pigs During 2022

DJ...So A-H3N2...

[url]https://www.thailandmedical.news/news/breaking-u-s-cdc-reports-first-case-of-human-infection-with-swine-flu-virus-and-warns-more-to-come[/url] or https://www.thailandmedical.news/news/breaking-u-s-cdc-reports-first-case-of-human-infection-with-swine-flu-virus-and-warns-more-to-come ;TMN

DJ, with billions of people (and very likely limited spread in pigs) catching CoViD immunity "landscape" did change...Our defenses against infections may be MUCH weaker...

Monkeypox was just a starter...other diseases will follow...

[url]https://www.cdc.gov/flu/swineflu/spotlights/first-human-infection-2022.htm[/url] or https://www.cdc.gov/flu/swineflu/spotlights/first-human-infection-2022.htm :

August 5, 2022—CDC has reported the first human infection  with an influenza (flu) virus that usually spreads in pigs occurring during 2022. The person had direct contact with pigs at an agricultural fair, where pigs tested positive for flu A. Recent reports of an increase in swine flu outbreaks in pigs in the U.S. suggest the risk of exposure and infection with these viruses may be higher than usual this fair season, which can last into the fall. CDC recommends people take precautions around swine, including in the fair setting.

Every year, there are rare sporadic human infections with flu viruses that usually spread in pigs. When found in people, these are called “variant flu virus” infections and designated with the letter “v” after the subtype. Variant flu virus infections are usually associated with contact with pigs, often at agricultural fairs. While these types of infections usually cause mild illness, they are concerning because they can cause severe illness, especially in people at higher risk of serious flu complications, and because of their potential to cause a flu pandemic.

The first variant flu virus infection of 2022 was reported by West Virginia and occurred in a person younger than 18 years who participated in an agricultural fair and had contact with pigs. An investigation is still ongoing but findings to date include:

  • The infected person was not hospitalized and is recovering from their illness.
  • The variant virus is a flu A H3N2v virus, based on RT-PCR testing done at CDC.
  • Pigs at this fair tested positive for flu A.
  • There have been reports of respiratory illness among other people who attended the same agricultural event. Specimens from other patients are being forwarded to CDC for additional testing.
  • To date, no person-to-person spread of this virus has been confirmed.

Agricultural fairs take place across the United States every year, primarily during the summer months and into early fall. Many fairs have swine exhibitions, where pigs from different places come into close contact with each other and with people. These venues may increase the risk of spread of flu viruses among pigs and between pigs and people due to these interactions.

DJ [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_swine_flu_pandemic[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_swine_flu_pandemic ; The 2009 swine flu pandemic, caused by the H1N1 influenza virus and declared by the World Health Organization (WHO) from June 2009 to August 2010, is the third recent flu pandemic involving the H1N1 virus (the first being the 1918–1920 Spanish flu pandemic and the second being the 1977 Russian flu).[12][13] The first two cases were discovered independently in the United States in April 2009.[14] The virus appeared to be a new strain of H1N1 that resulted from a previous triple reassortment of bird, swine, and human flu viruses which further combined with a Eurasian pig flu virus,[15] leading to the term "swine flu".[16]

so that Swine Flu Pandemic had "pig H1N1" as a basis...[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H3N2[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H3N2 ; Influenza A virus subtype H3N2 (A/H3N2) is a subtype of viruses that causes influenza (flu). H3N2 viruses can infect birds and mammals. In birds, humans, and pigs, the virus has mutated into many strains. In years in which H3N2 is the predominant strain, there are more hospitalizations.[1]

DJ...The CDC is going for A-H3N2v...underlining it is a swine flu....[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swine_influenza[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swine_influenza ;

Swine influenza virus is common throughout pig populations worldwide. Transmission of the virus from pigs to humans is not common and does not always lead to human flu, often resulting only in the production of antibodies in the blood. If transmission causes human flu, it is called zoonotic swine flu. People with regular exposure to pigs are at increased risk of swine flu infection.

Around the mid-20th century, identification of influenza subtypes became possible, allowing accurate diagnosis of transmission to humans. Since then, only 50 such transmissions have been confirmed. These strains of swine flu rarely pass from human to human. Symptoms of zoonotic swine flu in humans are similar to those of influenza and of influenza-like illness in general, namely chillsfeversore throatmuscle pains, severe headachecoughingweakness, shortness of breath, and general discomfort.

It is estimated that, in the 2009 flu pandemic, 11–21% of the then global population (of about 6.8 billion), or around 700 million to 1.4 billion people, contracted the illness—more in absolute terms than the Spanish flu pandemic. There were 18,449 confirmed fatalities. However, in a 2012 study, the CDC estimated more than 284,000 possible fatalities worldwide, with range from 150,000 to 575,000.[4][5] In August 2010, the World Health Organization declared the swine flu pandemic officially over.[6][7]

Subsequent cases of swine flu were reported in India in 2015, with over 31,156 positive test cases and 1,841 deaths.

DJ...CoViD, most Polio cases, Swine-Flu may present all with no/mild symptoms...still spreading/mutating...interacting in hosts...

If indeed CoViD(vaccinations) result in lower immunity (vaccines may bring less immunity when the vaccine is building up its immunity...so up to two weeks after vaccination ???) I think we are in "major trouble"...

Again-I am NOT an expert...but STOP THE SPREAD !!! Take diseases serious !

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 20 2022 at 12:34am

[url]https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/united-states/influenza-a-h3n2-v-novel-strain/956982-cdc-confirms-another-human-infection-with-flu-virus-from-pigs-in-oregon-h1n2v[/url] or https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/united-states/influenza-a-h3n2-v-novel-strain/956982-cdc-confirms-another-human-infection-with-flu-virus-from-pigs-in-oregon-h1n2v ;

CDC Confirms Another Human Infection with Flu Virus from Pigs in Oregon (H1N2v)


Source: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/swineflu/spo...-infection.htm

CDC Confirms Another Human Infection with Flu Virus from Pigs

August 19, 2022—CDC has reported another human infection with an influenza (flu) virus that usually spreads only in pigs, bringing the total number of such infections in the United States during 2022 to four. This new infection was caused by a different flu virus subtype (H1N2v) than the three previously reported infections (H3N2v) during 2022. Sporadic human infections with flu viruses that usually spread in pigs happen every year, often in the agricultural fair setting where pigs are present; however, not all variant virus infections have been in people with known pig exposure. This H1N2v infection occurred in a person who reported no contact with pigs or attendance at an agricultural fair. A public health investigation did not find any illness among household contacts and about 10 percent of reported variant flu virus infections in the United States since 2010 have been in people who did not have any documented swine contact. No person-to-person spread with this H1N2v virus has been confirmed.

An investigation into this situation has found that:
  • The infection occurred in a person younger than 18 years in Oregon.
  • The patient was not hospitalized and has recovered from their illness.
  • The infected person did not report having contact with pigs or attending an agricultural fair within 10 days of illness onset. An investigation of the patient’s household contacts did not find any additional illnesses.
  • No person-to-person spread of H1N2v virus associated with this person has been confirmed.
  • This is the first H1N2v virus infection reported in the United States during 2022.
When flu viruses that usually spread in pigs (called swine-origin flu viruses) are found in people, they are called “variant flu virus” infections and designated with the letter “v” after the subtype. While these types of infections usually cause mild illness, they are concerning because they can cause severe illness, especially in people at higher risk of serious flu complications, and because of their potential to cause a flu pandemic should they obtain the ability to spread easily from person to person in a sustained way.

In general, the risk of infection to the public from these infections is considered low, but each case of human infection with a variant flu virus should be fully investigated to be sure that such viruses are not spreading in an efficient and ongoing way in people, and to limit further exposure of people to infected animals if infected animals are identified. CDC is monitoring this situation closely and will make adjustments to the public health risk assessment and recommendations as circumstances warrant. CDC reports these cases in FluView. CDC will conduct additional laboratory tests on this variant flu virus, including analysis to determine whether flu vaccines stockpiled in case of a future flu pandemic would protect against infection and severe illness with this virus...

DJ, So 1x H1N2v, 3xH3N2v this year in the US...co-infection with CoViD may become problematic resulting in both more severe disease but also for a flu-virus to mutate and becoming better in spread...[url]https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/united-states/seasonal-flu-2009-2014-including-h1n1-pandemic-2009-aj/925260-us-fluview-weekly-surveillance-flu-report-2021-2022-season-for-trend-analysis?view=stream[/url] or https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/united-states/seasonal-flu-2009-2014-including-h1n1-pandemic-2009-aj/925260-us-fluview-weekly-surveillance-flu-report-2021-2022-season-for-trend-analysis?view=stream has 4xH3N2v

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dutch Josh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 20 2022 at 4:22am

[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H3N2#Swine_flu[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H3N2#Swine_flu ;

A 2007 study reported: "In swine, three influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1H3N2, and H1N2) are circulating throughout the world. In the United States, the classic H1N1 subtype was exclusively prevalent among swine populations before 1998; however, since late August 1998, H3N2 subtypes have been isolated from pigs. Most H3N2 virus isolates are triple reassortants, containing genes from human (HA, NA, and PB1), swine (NS, NP, and M), and avian (PB2 and PA) lineages. Present vaccination strategies for swine influenza virus (SIV) control and prevention in swine farms typically include the use of one of several bivalent SIV vaccines commercially available in the United States. Of the 97 recent H3N2 isolates examined, only 41 had strong serologic cross-reactions with antiserum to three commercial SIV vaccines. Since the protective ability of influenza vaccines depends primarily on the closeness of the match between the vaccine virus and the epidemic virus, the presence of nonreactive H3N2 SIV variants suggests current commercial vaccines might not effectively protect pigs from infection with a majority of H3N2 viruses."[4]

Avian influenza virus H3N2 is endemic in pigs in [[China, and has been detected in pigs in Vietnam, contributing to the emergence of new variant strains. Pigs can carry human influenza viruses, which can combine (i.e. exchange homologous genome subunits by genetic reassortment) with H5N1, passing genes and mutating into a form which can pass easily among humans. H3N2 evolved from H2N2 by antigenic shift and caused the Hong Kong Flu pandemic of 1968 and 1969 that killed up to 750,000 humans. The dominant strain of annual flu in humans in January 2006 was H3N2. Measured resistance to the standard antiviral drugs amantadine and rimantadine in H3N2 in humans had increased to 91% by 2005. In August 2004, researchers in China found H5N1 in pigs.[5]

DJ, of course [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H5N1#2021/2022_outbreaks_in_Europe/Atlantic_flyway[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_A_virus_subtype_H5N1#2021/2022_outbreaks_in_Europe/Atlantic_flyway is widespread (most) in (all types of) birds. 

A risk could be H3N2 mixing with H5N1 in swine and then spreading further..[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swine_influenza[/url] or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swine_influenza ;

Interaction with avian H5N1 in pigs[edit]

Pigs are unusual as they can be infected with influenza strains that usually infect three different species: pigs, birds, and humans.[25] Pigs are a host where influenza viruses might exchange genes, producing new and dangerous strains.[25] Avian influenza virus H3N2 is endemic in pigs in China and has been detected in pigs in Vietnam, increasing fears of the emergence of new variant strains.[26] H3N2 evolved from H2N2 by antigenic shift.[27] In August 2004, researchers in China found H5N1 in pigs.[28]

These H5N1 infections may be quite common; in a survey of 10 apparently healthy pigs housed near poultry farms in West Java, where avian flu had broken out, five of the pig samples contained the H5N1 virus. The Indonesian government has since found similar results in the same region. Additional tests of 150 pigs outside the area were negative.[29][30]

DJ IF CoViD infections result in less immunity protection for most flu could find "the doors wide open"...

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein
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